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I Feel Like I’m Having Déjà Vu With My Adopted Daughter: She’ll Tell Her Own Story – Pearl Thusi

Pearl Thusi prefer not to make a big deal about adopting her youngest child Okuhlekonke and wants her to detail her adoption story, if she chooses to when she is older.

In a recent interview on SABC 1’s Real Goboza, Pearl touched on being a mother to Okuhlekonke.

“I’m a mother to four-and-a-half-year-old Okuhlekonke and I have to wait for her to grow up and decide how she wants this story to be told.

“As much as I feel I’m a big part of this story, Thando is also a bigger part of this story in terms of the narrative right now. As much as I would like to say this is what happened and that happened, I have to protect so many people.

“in 15 years time if Okuhlekonke decides to tell you guys what happened and what’s happening, then that’s her choice to make.”

Pearl said Okuhlekonke has added a greater dynamic to the family.

Pearl said she tried not to make a big deal of the adoption because she is doing what countless women and grandmothers have done before her.

“It’s been really incredible. I’ve tried not to make a big deal of it in terms of talking about it. Women do this every day, our grandmothers did this for our parents. There are aunties, women have to travel and then someone has to take care of their children. It’s a village and I’m an African and I live by everything that an African means as much as I possibly can.”

“So, I feel like right now all that I can admit to is being her mother, and that I’m very proud of that, and that she’s a very sweet, kind and loving child.

“She’s amazing, Thando is the sweetest little big sister. She’s already got two other sisters and she’s been so helpful. I think because she’s got the same sisters who are the same age mates as Okuhlekonke, she’s been so helpful even with me now.”

While her eldest is 12 years old, Pearl said raising Okuhlekonke was like having déjà vu “all over again”.

“I feel like I’m having déjà vu because I haven’t had a four-year-old in, like, what — eight years? So everything feels new until I remember again.”

“I’m a mother to four-and-a-half-year-old Okuhlekonke and I have to wait for her to grow up and decide how she wants this story to be told”

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